Why Knee-high Compression Socks are Best for Nurses

Nursing is perhaps one of the most demanding jobs there is, now more than ever. Long shifts, long hours, and ever-changing days make it extremely tiring for the brave women and men who care for us. A common way that nurses and doctors keep up with the physical demands of their work (running around for 10+ hour shifts on their feet and saving lives) is wearing compression socks.

Nurse in knee high compression socks

Knee High Compression Socks for Nurses

Benefits from wearing compression socks can be felt almost instantly. Long shifts are hard enough, but long shifts without sitting can leave healthcare workers feeling like their legs are made of cement. Often times, this is because gravity is getting in the way of circulation. Blood pools at the bottom of the leg leaving them swollen and heavy. 

Compression socks aid the leg’s blood flow, allowing freshly oxygenated blood to refresh them. You may be wondering “why are knee high compression socks for nurses important?” Knee high socks allow for graduated compression. This therapeutic pressure starts at the ankle and works its way up the knee to increase circulation. Only compression socks for nurses that are knee high and thigh high allow for this type of compression.

We work with so many nurses, we even have a compression sock dedicated to their hope and heart. We hope to continue to support healthcare workers with every step of their journey, and anyway, we can.

What mmHg level should nurses get?

It is advised that nurses use 15-20 mmHg athletic knee high compression socks. However, in some cases they can benefit from higher levels of compression. This depends on the health and circulation needs of the individual. 

VIM & VIGR offers multiple compression levels along with multiple sizing options and fabric types. This allows healthcare workers to decide for themselves what the best knee high compression socks for nurses are.


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